Market Value of The Non Diamond Gemstone

Theres a good article about “Understanding the liquidation market value of the non-diamond gemstones”  here, written by David Atlas, a president of D. Atlas & Co.,Inc., partner in Diamond & Gem Laboratories of America and consultant to Imagem, Inc. who also as Expert witness, consumer consultant, lecturer and appraiser.

The conclusion I get from this article is … Continue reading

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June 28, 2010 Posted by | Close to Jewelry, Learn Diamond | Leave a comment

Best Way To Determine Our Ring Size

Written By : NGDlover

Notegolddiamond-The difficulty that usually occur in buying ring jewelry  is choosing the right size for our ring. Factors such as temperature (cold or hot weather), weight, diet, times, etc,  is likely to have an effect on people’s ring size. So, in order to save time and avoid annoyance, double check to make sure your ring size first. But What is the best way to determine our ring size ?

As long as your expected ring is round on the inside, the size is the internal diameter. But when it come into a wide or stick ring design, the inside diameter is not equal to the exact size of ring. So here the best way… Continue reading

March 15, 2010 Posted by | Buying Diamond ?, Buying Gold ?, Close to Jewelry | 4 Comments

If Your Gold Jewelry Is Time To Sell

By: NGDlover

If you have scrap or broken gold jewelry, think first to find out your stuff price on a buyer or jewelry first, cause jewelries from famous designers, or well craft or antique ones, or ones with valuable gemstones even priced better than if you bring just to melt it down.

You are suggested to go to accredited member of Accredited Jewelry Appraisal on your local area. This would have been good step to you, think that you don’t want other people rate low price to your jewelry after being took care with caferul attention.

The rest of the story, you can find in my article, if your gold jewelry is time to sell, here >>

February 17, 2010 Posted by | Close to Jewelry | 1 Comment

Best Way to Buy Genuine Watch Safely On the Store/Market or Online Store

By : NGDlover

Notegolddiamond –  Buying a genuine watch at a store or an online store could be fun or worse. But if you buy it wisely, your watch will be a part of your best life. As some people said, the more prestigious your watch, the more confidence yourself. No wonder there are lots of people who willing to buy branded watches in order to could show their status, including me :)…. so use your time wisely with paying attention to some of steps here in my article. I have write an explanation of ways to buy genuine watch on the store/market or online store in some common steps that easy to follow.

in explanation of buying at a store/market, there are 7 steps that must be done including do a small research, pay attention to the details, look for the function of the watch, pay attention to the movement of the watch, consult to a professional or in a forum I have listed, follow your commonsense, and check seller’s policy. An authorized dealers are potentially not a problem since most of watch sellers online are not authorized. Find  explanation about it here.

About buying online, there are some different steps to aware. including check the reliability of the seller by seeking a seller who is prominently promoted by an approved accredited body, and check for a web security or online protection mechanism when doing transaction or giving your data online.

Also, there is a list of useful sites to check, most of them are forums. So, please let me know your comment in my article here >>

February 16, 2010 Posted by | Close to Jewelry, Too Good to Archive | Leave a comment

Beautiful Animal Design on Gold Diamond Jewelry

How do you think of animal design on jewelry ? well, you better look at this animal design for gold diamond jewelries before you answer my question above. I just found them while searching on the net. they are beautiful !

Butterfly, blue tiger, bird
http://www.wiglaf.org

Bee brooch
http://www.luciecampbell.co.uk

Dolphin

http://www.christies.com

Do you wanna see more ? click here >>

February 5, 2010 Posted by | Close to Jewelry | 2 Comments

Gold Jewellery Alloys

Pure (24 carat) gold is a deep yellow colour (an orange shade of yellow) and is soft and very malleable. The coloured carat gold alloys range in gold content from 8 to 22 carats (33.3% – 91.6% gold) and can be obtained in a range of colour shades: green (actually a green shade of yellow), pale yellow, yellow, deep yellow, pink/rose and red. There are also white golds and even unusual coloured golds such as ‘purple gold’. They all have different mechanical properties such as strength, hardness and malleability (ductility) and some alloys can be heat treated to maximise strength and hardness. There are gold alloys that are optimised for different manufacturing routes such as lost wax (investment) casting and stamping.How can colour be varied and why do different gold alloys (an alloy is a mixture of two or more pure metals) have different mechanical and other properties? To answer these questions in depth requires a good technical knowledge of metallurgy. However, it is possible to give some simplified answers.

The Coloured Carat Golds

Almost all conventional, coloured carat golds are based on gold-silver-copper alloys, often with minor alloying additions. All three metals have the same crystal structure (face centred cubic, FCC) and so are compatible with each other over a large range of compositions. Typical minor additions include deoxidisers such as zinc and silicon, grain refiners such as iridium and cobalt and possibly metals such as nickel to strengthen the alloy. Larger zinc additions (about 1-2%) can improve melt fluidity and hence ‘castability’ in lost wax casting, as can silicon, resulting in better filling of the mould and better reproduction of surface detail. Even larger zinc additions (up to 10%) can improve malleability of certain carat golds, particularly 14 carat and lower, used for making jewellery by stamping from sheet. Additions of low melting point metals such as zinc, tin, cadmium and indium lower melting ranges and hence are used to make carat gold solders.

Colour

Gold is yellow and copper is red, the only two coloured pure metals. All other metals are white or grey in colour. The addition of a red colour to yellow, as every school child knows, makes the yellow pinker and eventually red. The addition of a white makes the yellow colour paler and eventually white. This principle of mixing colours is the same in carat golds. Adding copper to gold makes it redder and adding silver, zinc and any other metal makes gold paler. Thus, we can understand that lower carat golds, because we can add more alloying metals, can have a wider range of colours than the higher carat golds.
Thus at 22 carat (91.6% gold), we can only add a maximum of 8.4% of alloying metals and hence can only obtain yellow to pink/rose shades. At 18 carat (75.0% gold) and lower, we can add 25% or more alloying metals and hence get colours ranging from green through yellow to red, depending on the copper: silver plus zinc ratio. Thus at any given caratage we can vary the colour by varying the copper: silver plus zinc ratio. This can be demonstrated in the following table:

Type
Gold % wt
Silver %
Copper %
Colour
22 ct
91.6
8.4
Yellow
91.6
5.5
2.8
Yellow
91.6
3.2
5.1
Deep yellow
91.6
8.4
Pink/rose
18 ct
75.0
25.0
Green-yellow
75.0
16.0
9.0
Pale yellow, 2N
75.0
12.5
12.5
Yellow, 3N
75.0
9.0
16.0
Pink, 4N
75.0
4.5
20.5
Red, 5N
14 ct
58.5
41.5
Pale green
58.5
30.0
11.5
Yellow
58.5
9.0
32.5
Red
9 ct
37.5
62.5
White
37.5
55.0
7.5
Pale yellow
37.5
42.5
20.0
Yellow
37.5
31.25
31.25
Rich yellow
37.5
20.0
42.5
Pink
37.5
7.5
55.0
Red

Properties

Alloying additions affect other physical properties as seen in the next table:

Physical Properties of Typical Gold Alloys

Carat
Composition %
Colour
Density
g/cm3
Melting Range
°C
Silver
Copper
24
Yellow
19.32
1064
22
5.5
2.8
Yellow
17.9
995-1020
3.2
5.1
Dark yellow
17.8
964-982
21
4.5
8.0
Yellow-pink
16.8
940-964
1.75
10.75
Pink
16.8
928-952
12.5
Red
16.7
926-940
18
16.0
9.0
Pale yellow
15.6
895-920
12.5
12.5
Yellow
15.45
885-895
9.0
16.0
Pink
15.3
880-885
4.5
20.0
Red
15.15
890-895

As caratage reduces, the melting range and alloy density are lowered. But at any given caratage (gold content), the actual values vary according to the relative silver and copper contents.

As well as affecting physical properties, alloying additions to gold generally increase the strength and hardness, with some reduction in malleability / ductility. The silver atom is slightly larger than that of gold, so alloying gold with silver gives a moderate improvement in strength and hardness. The copper atom is significantly smaller than that of gold and so it has a greater effect on strengthening gold than silver, as it distorts the gold crystal lattice more. Thus reducing caratage from 24 carats through 22 ct and 21 ct down to 18 carat gold results in stronger and harder alloys, as can be seen in Table 3. Beyond 18 ct down to 10, 9 and 8 carats does not have much further effect.

Mechanical Properties of Typical Gold Alloys

Carat
Composition %, wt.
Condition
Hardness
HV
Tensile Strength
N/mm2
Silver
Copper
24
Annealed
20
45
Worked
55
200
22
5.5
2.8
Annealed
52
220
Worked
138
390
3.2
5.1
Annealed
70
275
Worked
142
463
21
4.5
8.0
Annealed
100
363
Worked
190
650
1.75
10.75
Annealed
123
396
Worked
197
728
18
12.5 0
12.5
Annealed
150
520
Worked
212
810
4.5
20.5
Annealed
165
550
Worked
227
880

Table 3.2: Mechanical Properties of 18 Carat Golds

Composition, wt%
Hardness, HV
Elongation, %
Gold
Silver
Copper
Annealed
Cold worked
Annealed
c.w.
75
25
36
98
36.1
2.6
75
21.4
3.6
68
144
39.3
3.0
75
16.7
8.3
102
184
42.5
3.2
75
12.5
12.5
110
192
44.8
3.3
75
8.3
16.7
129
206
47.0
2.6
75
3.6
21.4
132
216
42.0
1.5
75
25
115
214
41.5
1.4

c.w. = cold worked

However, copper-containing carat golds in the range of 8-18 carats can be hardened even further because of their metallurgy. Hard second phases can be precipitated out in the solid state as they cool below about 400°C, making the carat gold less ductile. Because of this, such alloys must be quenched in water after annealing to retain the single phase, ductile state if further working is required. This can be seen in the next table, Table 4.1

Effect of Cooling Rate on 18 Carat Golds after Annealing at 650°C

Composition, wt%
Hardness, HV
Gold
Silver
Copper
Slow cooled in air
Water quenched
75
25
56
56
75
22
3
90
88
75
17
8
138
136
75
12.5
12.5
160
160160
75
8
17
170
165
75
3
22
196
177
75
25
242
188

Special low temperature (ageing) heat treatments (typically 3-4 hours at 280 -300°C) can later be employed to give substantial hardening to such annealed and quenched alloys. This is known as age-hardening. In 18 ct red golds, the hardness can be doubled, as shown in Table 4.2!

Effect of Heat Treatment on 18 Carat Alloys

Composition %, wt
Colour
Condition
Hardness
HV
Tensile Strength
N/mm2
Silver
Copper
12.5
12.5
Yellow
Annealed, quenched
150
520
Aged
230
750
4.5
20.5
Red
Annealed, quenched
165
550
Aged
325
950

As all goldsmiths know, working a metal makes it harder and stronger, as we can see in the previous tables, but if it is overworked, it will eventually fracture. So, they know that worked carat golds must be annealed to restore the soft ductile condition. Typical annealing temperatures for carat golds are given in the following table:

Alloy
Annealing temperature
°C
Colour
Pure gold, 24 carat
200
Black heat
21 – 22 carat
550 – 600
Very dark red
18 carat
550 – 600
Very dark red
14 carat
650
Dark red
White gold (palladium)
650 – 700
Dull cherry red
White gold (nickel)
700 – 750
Cherry red
Sterling silver
600 – 650
Dark red

White golds

Apart from copper, all other alloying metals to gold will tend to whiten the colour and so it is possible to make carat golds that are white in colour. White golds for jewellery were developed in the 1920’s as a substitute for platinum.

Additions of any white metal to gold will tend to bleach it’s colour. In practice, nickel and palladium (and platinum) are strong ‘bleachers ‘ of gold ; silver and zinc are moderate bleachers and all others are moderate to weak in effect.

This has given rise to 2 basic classes of white golds – the Nickel whites and the Palladium whites. At the 9 carat (37.5% gold) level, a gold-silver alloy is quite white, ductile although soft and is used for jewellery purposes. White golds are available up to 21 carat.

There is no legal definition of what constitutes a ‘white’ colour in golds and hence trade description of white gold may not mean ‘detergent white’. Many commercial white golds are not a good white colour.

Nickel white golds

Nickel alloying additions form hard and strong white golds up to 18 carat. They are difficult to work and suffer from socalled ‘firecracking’. Most commercial alloys are based on gold-nickel-silver-zinc alloys with copper often added to improve malleability. This copper addition, of course, affects colour, and so such white gold alloys are not a good white colour – more a slight yellow/ brown tint, particularly if nickel content is also low. As a consequence, such white gold jewellery is normally electroplated with rhodium (a platinum metal) which is tarnish resistant and imparts a good white colour.

Unfortunately, many people, the female population especially, are allergic to nickel in contact with the skin and this gives rise to a red skin rash or irritation. The European Union countries have enacted legislation valid from the 20th January 2000 that limits nickel release from jewellery. Thus, in Europe, nickel white golds are being phased out and being replaced by palladium white golds. The USA is taking a more relaxed approach, requiring jewellery to be labelled as nickel-containing, and much jewellery in the West is now advertised as ‘non-allergenic’ or ‘nickel-free’. [See Separate Information Sheet, “The European Directive on Nickel….” and the article in Gold Technology, No 28, Spring 2000, “Nickel gets under your skin”]. Some typical nickel white gold compositions are shown in Table 6

Typical Nickel White Golds

Gold,
% wt
Copper,
% wt
Nickel,
% wt
Zinc,
% wt
Hardness
Hv
Liquidus
°C
18ct
75
2.2
17.3
5.5
220
960
75
8.5
13.5
3.0
200
955
75
13.0
8.5
3.5
150
950
14ct
58.5
22.0
12.0
7.4
150
995
10ct
41.7
32.8
17.1
8.4
145
1085
9ct
37.5
40.0
10.5
12.0
130
1040

Palladium white golds

Additions of about 10 -12% palladium to gold impart a good white colour. But palladium is an expensive metal, dearer than gold and it is also a heavy metal. Thus jewellery in such palladium white golds will be more expensive than identical pieces in nickel whites for 2 reasons: firstly, the cost of the palladium and secondly, the impact of density – palladium white golds are denser and so such jewellery will be heavier and also contain more gold. It is also more difficult to process as the melting temperatures are substantially higher.

Many commercial palladium white golds only contain about 6-8% palladium plus silver, zinc and copper. Some may even contain some nickel [so a palladium white gold is not necessarily nickel-free]. These may also have less than a good white colour and so may also be rhodium plated.

Palladium white golds tend to be softer and more ductile compared to nickel whites and so will not wear as well. They are available in all caratages up to 21 carat. It is not possible to have a 22 ct white gold, for example. Some typical compositions are given in Table7.

Typical Palladium Alloys

Gold
Pd
Ag
Cu
Zn
Ni
Hardn
Hv
Liq,
°C
18ct
75
20
5
100
1350
75
15
10
100
1300
75
10
15
80
1250
75
10
10.5
3.5
0.1
0.9
95
1150
75
6.4
9.9
5.1
3.5
1.1
140
1040
75
15
3.0
7.0
180
1150
14ct
58.3
20
6
14.5
1
160
1095
58.5
5
32.5
3
1
100
1100
10ct
41.7
28
8.4
20.5
1.4
160
1095
9ct
37.5
52
4.9
4.2
1.4
85
940

Pd- palladium; Ag- silver; Cu – copper; Zn – zinc, Ni – nickel. [In wt %]

Alternative white golds

In the European Union especially, there is a demand for cheaper alternatives to white golds than the palladium whites which are nickel-free. Many new alloys are coming to market, most of which rely on manganese additions as the main whitener. Some are palladium-free and others are low palladium alloys. Chromium and iron are also be used as whiteners. They tend to be hard and more difficult to process. Many of these alloys are not a good white colour, requiring rhodium plating, and many suffer cracking problems and tarnishing.

January 4, 2010 Posted by | Close to Jewelry, Learn Gold | Leave a comment

How You Can Appraise Jewelry From Home Or Work Home Study Training Course Reveals All Professional Secrets… Guaranteed!

source http://www.diamondsnews.com/appraise_diamond_ring.htm

Photo illustration for appraisal story  in Kansas City, Missouri. Unlike the show-up-with-your-old-stuff and hope-for-the-best “Antiques Roadshow,” getting appraisals for items in your home is real detective work: white-gloved research that involves hiring an appraiser (there’s a code of ethics they follow), looking through old books

Although they’re not mind readers, personal property appraisers know when they pick up the phone, the caller is eventually going to ask the same question: “What’s it worth?”

And in this shaky economy, the phones ring often.

“There’s an urgency to sell things because a lot of people are nervous about losing a job,” says Sharon Ring Rollins of Sugar Land, Texas, vice chairwoman of the American Society of Appraisers, one of the three main organizations that accredits appraisers.

The biggest misperception the public has about personal property appraisers is that they can immediately tell clients the values of pieces, similar to what happens on “Antiques Roadshow,” the public television program.

“We’re definitely not wizards with crystal balls who can just spit out the answer with a few computer keystrokes,” Rollins says. “It takes a lot of inspection and background work.”

And gritty work at that. The actual task resembles more the forensics on popular criminal-investigation shows than the quick televised “Roadshow” conclusions. Armed with a flashlight, appraiser Soodie Beasley fights spider webs and dust as she peers into the dark recesses of furniture to gauge wood oxidation, an indicator of age and consistency of parts. Her sleuthing includes pulling out drawers to inspect the carcass for dovetails. She also searches for labels to discover a piece’s maker.

Using a black-light wand, Beasley can tell whether a piece was ever painted. Black light also detects restorations; newly added paint fluoresces differently.

It’s also a useful tool for gauging the authenticity of decorative arts such as glass. American Brilliant Glass, made around 1880 to before World War II, will shine a greeny-yellow. Reproductions are usually white or soft purple under the glowing light.

“An appraiser must rely on a trained eye,” says Beasley, who specializes in furniture and decorative art appraisals. “Signs of wear must be in a logical pattern and not forced as if someone literally took sandpaper to it. In the old days, pieces were cut by stone, which gives a softer polished edge compared to diamond-bladed tools.”

Beasley’s professional-looking attire, typically a business suit, is usually covered in grime by the time she is finished with an inspection. Her hands get dirty, too, so she keeps a package of wipes in her tool kit, which also includes measuring tape and a magnifying glass.

Then Beasley has to write the appraisal, which includes a market analysis and other research. This often leads Beasley to computer databases or the library at the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art.

Appraisals are important documents that are used for insurance-replacement purposes or for taxes if items are charitable donations or part of an estate. Appraisers aren’t licensed through the government. But they pass the Uniform Standards of Professional Appraisal Practice exam to become a member of an appraisal organization.

Many collectors and academics become appraisers since they’re already experts in their fields of interests. Patricia Graham of Lawrence, an appraiser who specializes in Asian art, has a doctorate in Asian and Japanese art and speaks Japanese. Rachael Blackburn Cozad, director of the Kemper Museum of Contemporary Art, is a fine arts appraiser. Beasley, who also works as an ass

Read also: how to value jewelry How You Can Appraise diamond ring From Home Or Work Home Study Training Course Reveals All Professional Secrets… Guaranteed! visit Appraise diamond rings

January 4, 2010 Posted by | Close to Jewelry, Learn Diamond, Learn Gold | Leave a comment

Top 10 most Expensive Gemstones

A gemstone is a mineral in a natural crystalline form of a mineral. The rarity, the color, the size, the hardness, and the transparency of a gemstone depending entirely on its chemical components. Nature has offered us breathtaking gemstones which are desirable for their amazing beauty all over the world.

The rarity, durability and value of these gemstones make them a remarkable asset that can be enjoyed for generations. colored gems Gemstones don’t cease to amaze. Related to their beauty and rarity is also the wealth statement of the wearer. For thousands of years humans have been adorning themselves with gems and jewels to stand out and wow an audience.

Precious Gemstones vs. Semi Precious Gemstones

Precious gemstones are typically rarer, and therefore more expensive, than semi precious gemstones. Precious gemstones include diamonds, rubies, sapphires and emeralds. Although pearls are technically not considered gemstones since they are formed organically, some consider them to be the equivalent of precious gems, especially when they are quality South Sea or Tahitian pearls.Sapphire ring

Semi Precious gemstones are comprised of the remainder of gems, including amethyst, citrine, garnet, topaz, morganite, peridot, opal, jade and coral. These are typically less expensive than precious stones because they are more readily available, although there are definitely exceptions to the rule. Rare versions of semi precious stones, such as Mandarin garnet or a fine specimen of Alexandrite, can cost just as much if not more than a precious stone. Much of a gemstone’s price depends on size and quality, as well as the distinction of precious versus semi-precious.

General Price Tiers of Gemstones

To give you a general idea of the heirarchy of gemstone pricing, we’ve broken the most common gemstones out into three tiers: Most Expensive, Mid-Range and Affordable:

Most Expensive Gemstones: Diamond, Emerald, Sapphire, Ruby and Tanzanite

Mid-Range Gemstones: Aquamarine, Morganite, Peridot

Affordable Gemstones: Amethyst, Citrine, Garnet, Topaz

Top Ten

Whether we are talking about necklaces, rings, pendants, or bracelets, the precious and rare gems – mounted on jewelry – have long since become one of the favored ways to express just how much wealth one has. Here are the ten rarest and most expensive, of course, gems on earth:

Jadeite – over USD $3 Million/Carat

Red Diamonds – about USD $2-2.5 Million/Carat

Serendibite – about USD $1.8-2 Million/Carat

Blue Garnet – about USD $1.5 Million/Carat

Painite – about USD $50-60,000/Carat

Grandidierite – about USD $50,000/ Carat

Musgravite – about USD $35,000/Carat

Red Beryl Emerald – about USD $10,000.00/Carat

Black Opal – about USD $2,355/Carat

Jeremejevite – about USD $2000/Carat

Source Idea :
Gemstone Collection from Apples of Gold
jewelrybloguncovered.com

January 4, 2010 Posted by | 'Eager to Know' Stories, Buying Diamond ?, Close to Jewelry, News of Diamond | 1 Comment

Natural crystals Accessories that heal

When Jenny Raisinghani first heard of the healing powers of crystals, she decided to try them out.

She found the crystals worked for her, but the next question was how to wear them. So she began a new hobby – collecting the stones and creating necklaces out of them.

Her line of thinking was obvious enough: why not wear crystals as attractive accessories and get double the benefit – looking and feeling good?

During the five years since then, Jenny’s hobby has turned into a cottage industry, where she processes, cuts and tumbles the crystals before creating necklaces from them.

“I want to remove people’s misconceptions about crystals,” she says. “I want everyone to know that even though these natural crystals do not have the monetary worth of diamonds they are of a greater value because they possess healing properties.”

But what exactly does she mean when she talks about crystals? And what are these purported healing properties?

While the word “crystal” may conjure up images of fine drinking goblets and chandeliers, real crystals – that is, “natural crystals” – are formed under in the earth through a geological process called “nucleation”.

The wondrous process spits out crystals in a range of gorgeous colors; the way they grow, as molecules bind together, also imbues them with a sense of life. Consider, for example, the crystal kept in a French museum that is a meter tall and wide. In India, a single crystal nearly two meters tall and one meter wide has been found.

The crystals that have gained the most fame are quartz crystals, which have proved useful in human culture and endeavors since ancient times. One of the first types of crystals used by humans, quartz crystal is now one of the most important, as it is a key component in radios, radars, sonar, televisions and computers. Why? It’s all about energy: quartz crystals can relay and receive, build up, project and store energies.

And energy is at the heart of the crystal story.

Each crystal, whether a cluster or a single point, has its own story and mission. A crystal that moves from one person to another can bring each owner a different experience. It may bring joy to one person, laughter or calmness to another, perhaps comfort, for example, to someone grieving a loved one, and then healing or a meditation focus to another.

Beliefs in the healing powers of crystals date back to the ancient Egyptians, who also used them as jewels. They were used on the mummies of the pharaohs, as they were believed to possess mystical powers that could protect the rulers even in the after life.

Those who take crystals seriously look after them carefully; they cleanse the crystals by washing them in rain or pure water and reenergize them by exposing them to moonlight or sunlight for a couple of hours.

Crystals are believed to work on every level for spiritual, emotional, physical and mental healing. The basic concept of crystals as healers is that they absorb negative vibrations and release positive vibrations.

In crystal therapy, crystals are used to correct the imbalances of the chakras by releasing vibrations. This works on the theory that the human body has seven centers of energy or chakras (wheels of light). For optimum mental and physical health, these wheels need to be perfectly balanced. But sometimes this perfect flow of energy can be blocked or restricted. For each of the seven chakras is a specific energizing or unblocking crystal.

The Crown chakra, on the top of the head, uses the colors white, violet or pure gold. The appropriate crystals are clear quartz, fluorite and sugalite.

The Brow chakra -between the eyebrows – works with purple or indigo crystals, such as amethyst, sodalite lapis lazuli and azurite. The amethyst is used to treat insomnia; just place it under your pillow. It is also noted for its effect on spiritual enlightenment: when placed around the neck, it influences a seeker’s spiritual development.

It is also believed to soothe the soul and help the wearer to deal with traumas in life. The lapis lazuli is believed to be a mystical stone that can protect the wearer from psychic attacks. It is also said to be effective against sudden mental disturbances such as seizures and fits.

The Throat chakra, around the neck, has blue as its related color. Blue lace agate, sapphire, celestite, turquoise and aquamarine are used for this chakra. For those who are dealing with addictions to drugs, alcohol or cigarettes, aquamarine is offered as a tranquilizer crystal because it is said to calm the nerves and strengthens the ability to make changes.

The Heart chakra, which is found in the center of the chest area, works with green or pink crystals such as emerald, jade, aventurine, malachite and rose quartz. As the color pink is usually associated with emotion, rose quartz is known as the “Love stone”. It is supposed to lift the wearer’s spirits in many ways, easing depression and dispelling negative thoughts, especially fear, anger, resentment and jealousy. It is believed to be able to ease headaches when placed on the forehead.

The Solar Plexus chakra, on top of the navel, relates to the color yellow; its crystals are topaz, amber, tiger’s eye, citrine or yellow zircon. The citrine crystal looks like a topaz but has a different healing property – it is supposed to increase self-esteem.

The Sacral chakra, on top of the pelvis, matches the color orange, as in crystals such as carnelian, sunstone or calcite. A person who is shy and or has difficulty socializing might be advised to use the carnelian, which often serves as an amulet to gain popularity.

The seventh chakra is the Root chakra, which sits level with the reproductive organs. Its colors are black and red, as found in crystals such as obsidian, smoky, quartz, red jasper, ruby garnet, bloodstone or red agate.

For those who feel “liverish” from time to time, the ruby is helpful as it is supposed to purify and refine the blood. The bloodstone is believed to be helpful for people with poor blood circulation, as it warms up the body.

– Photos by Aruna Harjani

For more information or for consultations on what crystal might work for you, contact Jenny Raisinghani at zenjewelleryjkt@gmail.com

Aruna Harjani ,  Lifestyle

http://www.thejakartapost.com/news/2010/01/03/natural-crystals-accessories-heal.html


January 4, 2010 Posted by | Close to Jewelry | Leave a comment

   

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